• The difficulty lies not so much in developing new ideas as in escaping from old ones.

    John Maynard Keynes

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The Iron Capital Blog: Perspective


© sshepard Link License
  • Iron Capital Perspectives
  • May 19, 2021
  • Chuck Osborne

Academic Fraud

These ideas – a cancel culture, safe spaces, and trigger warnings – are antithetical to education. A truly educated person is open-minded, not afraid of being challenged, and perhaps most importantly capable of changing her mind and willing to do so in light of facts and reason. An educated person doesn’t burn books or tear down statues; in fact, they do the very opposite.


© Sadeugra Link License
  • Iron Capital Perspectives
  • April 29, 2021
  • Chuck Osborne

Don’t Mask the Symptom, Fix the Problem

Politicians are good at identifying symptoms that bother us – these are the building blocks of campaigns. Symptoms are easy to identify. It is also easy to identify ways of masking those symptoms, and it is a lot easier to mask them than to fix the problem. The student loan crisis is a great example. The political solution is to forgive the debt; but the problem is not the debt, it’s the cost of education.


© Martinns Link License
  • Iron Capital Perspectives
  • March 31, 2021
  • Chuck Osborne

The Devil Went Down to Georgia

I’m sure everyone is aware by now that we have some new voting laws in Georgia. This “conversation” is a great example of everything wrong with our political discourse today. I have no position on this bill either way; for me, the larger issue is our level of discourse.


© JJ Gouin Link License
  • Iron Capital Perspectives
  • February 25, 2021
  • Chuck Osborne

What Should Be the Minimum?

Paraphrasing Milton Friedman: If one actually cares about people, then she must care about results. So, what would the result of a nationwide $15 minimum wage actually be?


© scyther5 Link License
  • Iron Capital Perspectives
  • February 10, 2021
  • Chuck Osborne

The Client is Not Always Right

I believe Milton Friedman put it best when he said, “One of the great mistakes is to judge policies and programs by their intentions rather than their results.”